Monthly Archives: July 2012

Put your business on the map!

We’re printing a new McKinleyville street map, which will be part of a visitor’s guide. We’ll insert 2,000 copies in the McKinleyville Press, so every reader will get a free copy. We’ll donate 1,000 to the local schools. Each advertiser will get a stack of maps. The McKinleyville Chamber is acquiring maps to pass out at its office.

You need to book your ad space as soon as possible. There’s only so much room for ads on the map, so we could easily run out of space.

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Front page 7.18.12

Here is this week’s front page. To read the entire issue, buy a copy today. They’re available at 36 locations in McKinleyville, Trinidad, Fieldbrook, Arcata and Eureka. Click here to find the location nearest you.

Better yet, you should subscribe. By doing so you’ll get the paper every week in the mail. You’ll also help support old-fashioned community journalism. Click here to subscribe.

If you own a business you should advertise. Lots of eyeballs will see your advertisement. Remember that people who get the Mighty McK Press actually pay for it. It’s not something that they didn’t ask for – something plunked down on their lawns that they may or may not read. They buy it because they read it. So they’ll see your ad.

 

 

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New Trinidad Pier

From the July 4, 2012 edition.

By Jack Durham
Press Editor

The new and improved Trinidad Pier is now open to the public.
Most of the work on the $7.4 million project is nearly complete, with construction crews finishing up only a few minor details.
The Trinidad Rancheria, which purchased the pier and harbor facilities in 2001, began working on the project back in 2006 and had to go through a lengthy, complicated permitting process. Actual construction began last September,
The impetus for reconstructing the pier was twofold. The old pier, built in 1946, had structural deficiencies. The creosote-treated Douglas fir pilings that held up the pier were rotting. During stormy weather, visitors to the pier could feel it slightly rise and fall with the swells. Wooden planks were constantly being replaced. The railing was falling apart,
More importantly, there were water quality concerns, heightened by Trinidad Harbor’s designation as an “Area of Special Biological Significance” by the California Water Resources Control Board. There were worries that the creosote in the pilings holding up the pier were leaching into the kelp beds, where rivers otters, seabirds and a variety aquatic life dwell.
The new pier – which is about the same size as the old one – solves that problem.
The old pilings were removed and replaced with 24-inch diameter, 3/4-inch thick steel pilings coated with a non-reactive polymer. Instead of a surface made up of thick wooden boards, the new pier has an impervious concrete deck that is gently sloped so all the rainwater runoff can be collected and treated without going into the bay. Any oils or other fluids that might leak from vehicles on the pier won’t end up polluting the bay.
Rainwater that falls on the pier drains to the east side and enters a pipe, which then drains to a land-based filtration system. That means zero pollution from pier runoff.
Not only is the new pier eco-groovy, it’s also built like a tank.

 


“We can drive an 80,000 pound semi truck on this,” said Trinidad Rancheria CEO Jacque Hostler.
When it’s crab season, semi trucks can pull directly onto the pier.
And when a crowd gathers on the pier each November for the annual Blessing of the Fleet, there won’t be any nervous chatter about the pier moving up and down.
Other amenities
The new pier features lights on both sides which automatically turn on and illuminate the pier at night. The old pier only had a few lights at the far end for the fishermen.
At the end of the pier there are four new hoists to lift crab totes and gear from fishing boats. There’s also a new weigh master shed at the end.
A new aluminum gangway ramp, built to boat ramp standards of the Americans with Disabilities Act, leads down to the floating dock, which is heavily used during the salmon season.
Rate increases
The Trinidad Rancheria recently increased the mooring and boat launching fees for the harbor, which triggered some customers to write letters complaining of the increase. (One letter was printed in the June 20 edition of the McKinleyville Press.)
The annual mooring permits were raised from $500 to $600. The boat launch fee went up from $30 to $35.
Hostler explained that fees go directly to the operating costs of running the harbor. None of the money goes to pay for the pier project, which was financed with state, federal and local grants, along with Trinidad Rancheria transportation money.
During crabbing season, running the harbor requires from eight to 12 employees, sometimes more.
“This business is very labor intensive,” Hostler said.
The rate increases were necessary so that the harbor can maintain staffing levels and try to at least break even financially, she said.
Making the pier
a destination
Now that the pier project is nearly complete, the Rancheria would like to make it more of a destination for tourists and the community.
Hostler said that the Rancheria would like to see the pier used for kayak rentals, eco-tours, fishing contests and all sorts of other activities. Perhaps, she said, there could be art festivals on the pier, or even concerts.
The nearby Seascape Restaurant, which is open from 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. will soon get a new paint job. Adjacent landscaping will also be replaced and upgraded as the Trinidad Rancheria continues to improve the 6-acre harbor site, which also has a bait shop, new public restrooms, and a new state-of-the-art wastewater treatment facility.

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Wardrobe Malfunction – McK Totem Pole Endures Nature’s Abuse

From the 7.4.12 edition

By Jack Durham
Press Editor

It’s not easy being the McKinleyville Totem Pole.
Buffeted by wind and rain, hammered by hail, and pecked by birds, Ernie Pierson’s monumental masterpiece endures all sorts of abuse.
Sometime in the third week of June, the elements were too much for the hat that crowns Thunderbird, the top-most character on the World’s Largest Totem Pole. A piece on the south side of the copper hat lifted up and now projects upward like an ear on a dog.
I first noticed the anomaly while driving by the totem pole while treasure hunting at garage sales on Saturday, June 23. “There’s a bird perched on top,” I told my wife, who patiently puts up with my obsession with what is arguably the greatest work of art on display in Northern California. Well, if not the greatest, it’s certainly one of the largest.
A few days later I looked up and noticed that what I thought was a bird was still there, and in a location where I’ve never seen birds perch. How could this be?
Upon closer inspection it became clear that it wasn’t a bird; it was a wardrobe malfunction.
From down below, one perceives that the protruding copper plate is small, maybe 6 inches. But that’s an illusion caused by the height of the pole, which is 144 feet and 8 inches from the bottom of the pole to the top of the hat. (As reported in the Feb. 22, 2012 edition of the Press, the pole was measured in December 2011 by David A. Crivelli and Michael D. Pully, professional surveyors of the Points West Surveying Co. Visit www.mckinleyvillepress.com to read that article.)
Keep in mind that Thunderbird’s wingspan is 12 feet, big enough that two average size adults could stretch out, end to end, over the length of the wings. So the protruding copper is fairly large, although how large is anyone’s guess.
The damaged hat joins a few other broken items at the top of the pole. There used to be two antennae sticking up at the top. In 1999, one of the antennae flopped over and dangled from the top. Sometime later, the second antennae did the same thing. So the tallest point on the totem pole is the little metal rod sticking up, which is at 159 feet, 5 1/2 inches.

There are also several holes in the totem pole, including one right in Thunderbird’s eye. Birds nest in the holes. Sometimes you can see chicks sticking their heads out the holes, while their parents perch on Thunderbird’s colorful wings.

The damage, though, does not distract from the landmark. It only makes it more interesting.
It’s not a static work of art. It’s ever changing, with nature interjecting herself into the viewing experience.
On a clear morning, the pole is bathed in an orange light. Grizzly Bear, Redheaded Woodpecker and Beaver – characters repainted by Duane Flatmo in 1998 – take on a warm, cheerful glow. As the sun reaches its zenith, pinline shadows are cast in the carved outlines, giving the pole contrast in the harsh light. By evening, the pole becomes a silhouette.
The sky is always part of the viewing experience, providing a backdrop of process blue, or cottonball clouds, or, more often than not, a sea of gray. Sometimes the weather acts as a filter, with Crow and Blue Jay visible through gauze-like layer of fog.
People meander in the shadow of the totem pole every day, but often forget to look up. Their faces are buried in their mobile devices absorbing digital transmissions. But above them lurks a wondrous piece of folk art, erected 50 years ago in 1962, but still changing and evolving with Mack Town.
So next time you’re there, stop for a moment. Gaze up. Admire.

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Front page 7.11.12

Here is this week’s front page. We wish we could share all the other pages and let you read the entire issue for free, but we need your 50 cents a week to pay for gas, electricity, ink, paper and the other other expenses involved in putting out an old-fashioned weekly newspaper. To read the entire issue, buy a copy today. They’re sold at more than three dozen locations in McKinleyville, Fieldbrook, Trinidad, Arcata and Eureka. Click here for a list.

Better yet, why don’t you subscribe? You’ll receive the mighty McK Press every week in the mail.  For in-county subscribers, the cost is only $25 a year. That’s only 48 cents a week! That’s cheap. Click here to subscribe.

If you own a business, you should advertise. We have low, low rates. Click here for advertising information.

Also, when it comes time to run those pesky legal ads, like fictitious business name statements, petitions for change of name, etc. don’t forget us. We’re a legally adjudicated Humboldt County newspaper.

 

 

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Front page 7.4.12

Due to the holiday, this week’s front page is getting posted early. To read the entire paper, buy a copy today. You really should subscribe.

 

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